Changing the world by how we think

Groundbreaking research on the connective power of human consciousness appears to pave the way on what might one day have a major impact on how we train our minds, beliefs and thoughts. We have a real opportunity to become agents of positive change.

Experiments conducted by Roger D. Nelson from Princeton University reveal that our consciousness is able to reach across time and space to commune with another consciousness, changing subtle aspects of our world or even the behavior of technical devices.

The collective unconscious mind in a unified whole

It confirms the theories of such great thinkers as Carl Gustav Jung and the sages of old who believed that there is not only innate knowledge passed through generations but a collective unconscious mind of a unified whole.

What we think and how we take control of our emotions and thoughts has a very real impact on the world, according to the research conducted by Nelson and his team. He elaborates on the research in his book “Connected – The Emergence of Global Consciousness.”

Nelson correlated data with major recent global events such as the September 11, 2001 terror attacks, the deaths of Lady Diana and Nelsons Mandela, finding that a global consciousness appears to show reactions even prior to the event – in the case of the first plane crashing into the twin towers ten minutes before the event.

The event, as we well know, changed the course of our world post 9/11 fanning wars and hostilities in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria and many other countries.

But interestingly Nelson also looked at the growing number of web-organized groups synchronizing their intentions to create a better world. When large groups of people gather in positive emotional acts such as prayer and meditation human interconnection takes on a particularly strong frequency.

Creating a better world through synchronized intention

“Events that are judged to evoke or embody great compassion have a much larger effect size than those showing little or none,” Nelson points out. It is at the heart of the Buddhist tradition taught by the Dalai Lama. “If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.”

Nelson’s research over several decades clearly shows that the human mind is not isolated within an individual body. We are social beings that are very much interconnected. How we treat ourselves and others in “mass consciousness” will very much determine the future of our species in the coming years. There is an interconnection between us and the environment around us.

The world’s most sacred sites of worship were not chosen at random. The pyramids in Egypt, the Temple Mount in Jerusalem, Stonehenge in England, Notre Dame in Paris, and the Camino paths of Europe leading to the St. James crypt in Santiago de Compostela form a network of the earth’s subtle energy system.

Group meditations, chanting and singing at sacred places such as the interior chambers of the Great Pyramid were measured by the scientific team showing significant deviation from periods when there was no activity. All but one of the ancient sacred sites in Egypt showed a positive trend with one exception which was the temple at Philae. It was moved from its original location before it was flooded by a man-made lake.

Some years ago the British scientists Rupert Sheldrake espoused the idea of a “morphic resonance” with natural systems inheriting a collective memory from all previous things of their kind.” Sheldrake’s theory of “telepathy-type interconnections between organisms” was ridiculed as pseudo-science.

Did our ancestors find places imbued with special powers?

“Morphic fields of social groups connect together members of the group even when they are many miles apart, and provide channels of communication through which organisms can stay in touch at a distance,” according to Sheldrake.

The growing body of research confirms that ritual and prayer connects us to the past and the present in a powerful way. The re-enactment of a founding story or myth, as in the Jewish Passover celebration, the Christian Holy Communion and the American thanksgiving dinner, forms a significant part in creating social cohesion in a body community with a shared culture and past.

It serves also as a powerful warning that we harm both ourselves and our world by mindlessly spending a large portion of our time and attention on the distractive pull of toxicity on social media.

Reino Gevers – Author – Mentor – Speaker

One more thing…

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